University of Pennsylvania Health System

Penn Health and Wellness

Tuesday, January 3, 2012

Meet Your Weight Loss Goals in the New Year


For people struggling with excess weight, the new year is a fresh opportunity to meet their weight loss goals. There are a variety of options available, and it is important that each individual finds a weight loss solution tailored to their unique needs and provides the tools and support structure to help them succeed. For patients with morbid obesity, generally defined as being 100 pounds or more overweight, bariatric surgery may be an option.

For more than 20 years, the multidisciplinary team of bariatric specialists at the Penn Metabolic and Bariatric Surgery Program have provided comprehensive weight loss care, including free information sessions, personalized treatment plans and the latest, most advanced treatment options. Penn’s bariatric surgeons perform more than 700 procedures each year, making it the most active program in the greater Philadelphia region.

Take a Deep Breath and Quit Smoking Comfortably this Holiday Season

Smoking causes nearly one in five deaths every year in the United States, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. In addition, it significantly increases the risk for lung cancer, stroke and coronary heart disease. While more than 46 million American adults are smokers, approximately 70 percent want to quit.

“Smoking is more than a dirty habit,” says Frank Leone, MD, MS, director of Penn’s Comprehensive Smoking Treatment Program. “Most people who smoke know the risks, but they are addicted. They expect to suffer uncomfortable side effects and they are afraid to fail. Our goal is to help them quit, but maintain a normal life and level of comfort during the process.”

Penn’s Comprehensive Smoking Treatment program is one of only 10 programs of its kind in the country. For more information or to schedule an appointment, call 888-PENN-STOP (7366-7867) or 800-789-PENN (7366).

Learn more about Penn’s Comprehensive Smoking Treatment Program.

PennCare for Kids Doctors Agree: HPV Vaccine Benefits Boys, Too


Doctors are now encouraging boys to get the same human papiloma virus (HPV) vaccine as girls, based on the latest recommendations from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

In the past, only girls between the ages of 11 and 26 were encouraged to receive the vaccine. The vaccine can prevent several types of HPV infection and reduce the girls’ risk of developing cervical, vulvar and vaginal cancer. The CDC has now added boys age 11 years and older to the recommendation because HPV has also been linked to an increased risk of penile cancer as well as anal and oropharyngeal cancers.

Learn more about HPV and why your child should be vaccinated

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